Tag Archives: acupuncture

Acupuncture Can Work Miracles!

04-12-02 stoney 2

Stoney was 14 years old when he was carried into my office by his owners. His rear legs had been paralyzed for seven weeks and conventional treatments had not helped. X-rays revealed severe arthritis of his spine but that alone did not explain his condition. Possible causes for his neurologic deficit included a spinal tumor, a ruptured disc, or even a blood clot to the spinal cord. An MRI or myelogram was needed to be sure of what the problem was, but his owners did not think it was in his best interest to put Stoney through those testes. Acupuncture was his last chance.

An aged pet with long standing rear leg paralysis does not warrant a rosy outlook and I was not optimistic about the ability of acupuncture to help him. After hearing about the acupuncture process and the poor prognosis, Stoney’s owners decided that they wanted to give him every chance they could and we proceeded with the treatment with hope in our hearts.

Stoney came to my office for weekly treatments; right on schedule. When his owners carried him in for his eighth session, I told them that I was seeing no improvement and suggested it was time to admit defeat. On the contrary, his owners were encouraged by the fact that he had begun to wag his tail so the treatments continued. You could have picked my jaw off the floor when Stoney walked into my office two treatments later.

We were able to taper his treatments to every three to four weeks and maintain Stoney’s mobility. He enjoyed another three years with his owners until his body finally gave out and we put him to sleep at the age of 17.

Have you experienced any miracles?

5 Steps to a Healthy Pet

Painted pup

I would like to start 2016 by keeping it simple. Over the years I’ve written about research and my own experience that informs my views on pet health care. I’ve been working in the veterinary field for over 30 years with more than 20 years of holistic/integrative practice. I would like to sum it up with 4 simple ideas that I think will give every pet the best chance for a long, healthy life.

  1. DIET – Nutrition is the basis for health. We simply cannot expect any animal to be healthy if they are not provided the raw materials needed to build a healthy body. Our pets evolved eating raw food. They retain the genetic programming for diets that are high in protein and low in carbs (the opposite profile of conventional diets). The high-heat processing of commercial pet foods destroys micronutrients and creates carcinogens. Pets benefit from a species-appropriate, balanced, raw diet.
  2. Healthy Weight – Speaking of diet, keeping your pet at a healthy weight will help him live a longer life with fewer chronic disease issues like arthritis. You should be able to feel your pet’s ribs along the side of the body and there should be a narrowing at the waist.
  3. VACCINES – Wile I am not against all vaccines I have found that the mainstream veterinary community tends to over-do it. Every pet does not need every vaccine every year. It is important to be sure your pet has immunity to distemper and parvo. Blood titers can be done to see if a pet needs the vaccine. Giving more vaccines than are needed does not increase immunity; it just screws up the immune system. The rabies vaccine is mandated by law and in my experience a healthy animal can handle a vaccine every 3 years. Other vaccines such as leptospirosis, lyme, and bordetella should be given on an as needed basis. DO NOT give more than one vaccine at a time.
  4. MEDICAL INTERVENTIONSWhenever possible, natural/holistic therapies such as herbs, supplements, acupuncture, chiropractic, and homeopathy should be used over conventional medications. My main concern with Western medicine is that there are often side effects from such medicines that can be avoided by using more natural treatments.
  5. SPAY/NEUTER – Recent research shows that sterilizing a pet before it is fully mature causes changes in bone growth. These alterations throw off the biomechanics of the joints and predispose the pet to hip dysplasia and cruciate ligament rupture. Spaying and neutering at any age appears to promote cancer. (Find research on this here) Depending on a pet caregiver’s lifestyle and tolerances and the pet’s behavior, it appears that it is best to hold off on spaying and neutering any pet until it is 2-3 years old. Consider Zeutering male dogs.

There you have it, pet health in a nutshell: feed raw, limit vaccines, go holistic, delay spay/neuter.

What have you found the most helpful for your pets?

Life-Saving Acupressure Point You Need to Know

04-24-04 GV 26

Acupuncture is the oldest medical system on earth. It is still used today because it works. Stimulating an acupuncture point triggers nerves to send signals to the brain. In response, the brain releases bioactive substances, such as endorphins, into the system affecting the whole body. The body’s response to acupuncture depends on which point(s) are activated.

The best way to stimulate an acupuncture point is with an acupuncture needle. However, for anyone who doesn’t have one of these tools handy, a fingertip will do. In the case of the pint I’m about to discuss, I would suggest stimulating it with your fingernail.

Governing Vessel 26 (GV 26) is located where the “leather” of the nose meets the fur of the upper lip, right where that interface crosses the center groove in the nose and lip. This point is used for resuscitation. With the use of this point, I have made believers out of every skeptical vet I’ve ever worked with. I have seen the strong stimulation of this point bring apparently dead pets back to life.

GV 26 is used for such things as shock, respiratory arrest, and cardiac arrest. When I use a needle to stimulate this point, I drive the tip down to the bone and vigorously tap the bone. (You would obviously never use this technique on a conscious pet). If I did not have a needle to use, I would jab a fingernail into the point and vibrate it hard and fast.

Studies have shown that stimulating GV 26 stabilizes brain chemistry and stimulates the heart and respiratory centers. It can be used any time a pet loses consciousness such as when a pet has suffered physical trauma. It can even help puppies or kittens if they stop breathing during the birthing process. This point is even being taught to veterinarians and technicians taking conventional ER medicine courses.

If your pet were to get hit by a car or pass out from some other cause, the first thing to do is call the ER vet and get on your way. While en route, someone should stimulate GV 26 with everything they’ve got. This technique may just be enough to keep your pet alive until you reach professional help.

Have you ever used acupressure on your pet?